DiscoverHealth

A child is excited about a snowman balloon creature at the Pediatric Rehab Christmas Party

Christmas party delights, supports pediatric rehab patients

Manny Green looked happy and proud as he showed off the remote control toy cars he received at the twenty-first annual Spartanburg Regional Pediatric Rehabilitation Christmas party. The gift was selected by his therapist to support his developmental goals.

He and his brother, Anthony, were among approximately 500 children in the pediatric rehab program who received handpicked gifts this year.

“It goes beyond what their therapists have to do, and it reminds us that they really care about the boys,” said Benny Green, father of Manny and Anthony.

Philanthropist Judy Bradshaw funds the purchase of the presents as well as the party, held each year in the Spartanburg Regional Outpatient Center.

“It’s so fun to come to this event and see the children having a nice time,” Bradshaw said.

“It’s our favorite day of the year,” Bradshaw’s husband Charlie said.

Children and their families were certainly having plenty of fun. There was face-painting, balloon-sculpting, treats, and pictures with Santa Claus. Shelldon the Turtle, the SRHS pediatric mascot, also made an appearance.

“It’s a really nice event,” said Latoya Stallings, whose four-year-old son John is a pediatric rehab patient. “I like seeing him having a good time with all the other kids.”

“The party helps caregivers and patients bond,” said Tracie Rodak, director of rehabilitation services. “I think that for the children to know that a party is being held in their honor makes them feel that this is a fun place to come for therapy. And it’s a chance for us to give back to those who struggle.”

Judy Bradshaw noted that the first pediatric rehab Christmas party, more than two decades ago, was for 80 children. The rehab program’s tremendous growth in the years since is a testament to the strength of the services it offers, which include physical, occupational and speech therapies.

Rodak added that advances in medicine have made it easier for doctors and parents to identify development issues early. “The earlier you can get children into the program, the better the potential for their progress,” she said.

Christmas isn’t the only time of year the Bradshaws make a difference for pediatric rehab patients. The Bradshaw Pediatric Rehabilitation Assistance Fund also covers the cost of equipment or home supplies that support children’s development and quality of life but are not covered by insurance.

“The Bradshaws have been such wonderful supporters of these children over the years,” Rodak said. “We are truly grateful for their generosity.”

To make a donation to the Bradshaw Pediatric Rehabilitation Assistance Fund, please visit https://regionalfoundation.com/donate-now/families/.